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Born 1966 in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Diana Krall had good starting point to succeed in music. Her father, James Krall, is a passionate record collector, so Diana Krall listened to music of great jazz legends such as Fats Voler, Theolonius Monk, Dinah Washington and others during childhood.

Diana’s family had strong musical affections; they use to get around piano at evening, taking turns in playing and singing. Diana Krall rarely misses opportunity to mention her family and importance of musically enriched childhood and warm atmosphere surrounding her during that time.

Diana Krall started taking piano lessons at age of four. Starting with classical music, she moved on to jazz by high school. Bryan Stovell, bass teacher, introduced her to the high school jazz band. As first in long line of Diana’s jazz teachers he made great influence on Diana, by presenting her music of John Coltrane, Bill Evans, Carmen McRae, Sarah Vaughan and other contemporary jazz musicians.

By listening to records Diana Krall widened her musical horizons at that time. First professional appearance Diana Krall made at the age of fifteen in the hometown restaurant, playing few nights a week. Louise Rose, pianist and singer, was her piano teacher at that time and first to teach her in singing as well.

Graduating from high school, Diana Krall won Vancouver Jazz Festival scholarship that helped her to continue education at Berkeley College of Music in the early 80’s. After studying for about a year and a half, Diana Krall returned to Nanaimo in the age of 19. She continued to play occasionally in the restaurant.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diana
    Krall
  biography of Diana Krall
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Diana Krall

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"She's breathy in a way that evokes days when male-female relationships seemed more relaxed and less politically charged, not to mention more mysterious and alluring instead of in-your-face."

Robert Spencer, "All About Jazz"

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